1 MARCH - 2 APRIL 2017

LOST LUMENS | MICHELLE DAY
MULTITUDE |ALEX SANSON


Michelle Day,  Bumble-cycle  2015 - 2017, cast and welded aluminium, glass  and LED electronic elements, H 32  x 188 cm, W x 40 deep cm. Image Credit: Paul Hay

Michelle Day,  Bumble-cycle  2015 - 2017, cast and welded aluminium, glass  and LED electronic elements, H 32  x 188 cm, W x 40 deep cm. Image Credit: Paul Hay

 
 
 
Alex Sanson, Murmuring 2016, carbon steel, stainless steel, ostrich feathers, bearings and pigment, 170cm x 110cm    

Alex Sanson, Murmuring 2016, carbon steel, stainless steel, ostrich feathers, bearings and pigment, 170cm x 110cm
 
 

view exhibition catalogues:

MICHELLE DAY 

Michelle Day’s exhibition, Lost Lumens, will feature a series of her light objects, which are influenced by the contemplation of the awe-inspiring aspects of nature and the unimaginable. To view the exhibition catalogue click here

 

Her light objects are intricately designed and created from a range of media including steel, aluminium and electrical elements, through which she aims to highlight the simultaneous beauty and horror of life.   “I’m intrigued by light, whether it is natural light from the sun, pouring through my window, or the radiating artificial city lights. Light has the ability to instil mindfulness or contemplation, and can create a sense of stillness, or joy, or the transfixing, daydreaming quality experienced in the glow of a campfire.”

Michelle Day is a sculptor and installation artist based in Canberra. She has gained a growing reputation since graduating from the Australian National University School of Art in 2009 and has exhibited extensively in Australia and internationally. Michelle  is the recipient of several prestigious grants including from the Australia Council for the Arts, ArtsACT and the Freedman Foundation.  To view her website click here

To view the exhibition catalogue click here
For an essay by Mark Henshaw about Michelle's work click here

 
 

ALEX SANSON

Multitude is a display of two large-scale kinetic sculptures by Alex Sanson, which viewers are able to bring to life by manually moving the delicate handles.

“I’m intrigued by the movement and mechanics of things,” Alex said. “Each of my sculptures is designed around both movement and form, to engage with and involve the viewer. I love to make sculptures that are interactive and can be touched, and that have a delicate sense of balance.”

Murmuring seeks the balance between independent and inter-dependent movement and the harmony that may lie there and indeed invites the viewer to create their own pattern or chaos. Murmuring was first installed at the Yering Station Sculpture Exhibition, 2015, where it won the major award.

Building on ideas of how otherwise independent entities may be profoundly influenced by their neighbours or peers, Pisculenta draws on the schooling of fish, with no one leader but many teaming individuals, linked yet discrete. The viewer is invited to interact with the work and be the spark that initiates an unpredictable flight of the manifold elements.

Alex Sanson (also known as Metaform) has been working as a sculptor and designer for over 20 years, with a focus on architectural, interactive, kinetic or simply playful works. Building both small-scale pieces and large installations, his work has been shown in many galleries and featured at numerous festivals and outdoor events, including WOMAD, Melbourne Fringe Festival, Earthdance and Rainbow Serpent.

 

 

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