6th january 2018 - 18th february 2018

group exhibition | art + body politic

With the overwhelming result in the non-binding voluntary survey on same sex marriage declared, the subsequent jostling of politicians, the anger and the love of our society, the pressure and stress of personal politics upon the community, The Lost Ones Contemporary Art Gallery takes a closer look at the art of the body politic. This is a group show examining the work of artists who use their bodies to make political statements, or use their art to declare a position that is both personal and political.

Politics should stay out of the bedroom, and yet the deeply personal - our gender, our sexuality - can be also deeply political.

However the dense nature of the arguments, the heated discussions, belie the fact that art, sex, gender, sexuality and love is also embracing and sometimes just funny.

Artists in this group show include:

  • Lucas Grogan
  • Liam Benson
  • Paul Yore
  • Kirsten Fredericks
Kirsten Fredericks - 'Please Explain - Clitterati', 2017.  Yarn, paper and polyester thread

Kirsten Fredericks - 'Please Explain - Clitterati', 2017.  Yarn, paper and polyester thread

Paul Yore - Mother Tongue 2017. Mixed media textile, beads, buttons, sequins, acrylic, enamel, watercolour, found objects 348 x 212cm (irreg)

Paul Yore - Mother Tongue 2017.
Mixed media textile, beads, buttons, sequins, acrylic, enamel, watercolour, found objects
348 x 212cm (irreg)


21 february - 1 april

It’s very sad that a person fears her safety, just because she supports basic human rights. In this atmosphere, fighting for women’s rights is a luxury for many people.
— Gizem, 2016.

alana holmberg | resist laughter

Alana Holmberg (b. 1983) is an emerging Australian photographer known for her emotive portraiture and multimedia projects. To date, her independent work has explored the experiences of women in relation to family, feminism and body image -- investigations that continue to inform and challenge her own identity. Alana's collection of images in the Resist Laughter exhibition are from Turkey. They investigate the power structures of the region and the impact that these have had upon the populace.

Inspired initially by a tweet  - an image of young women laughing in the street and the Turkish words #direnkahkaha (resist laughter), the post was one of thousands shared by Turkish women to protest comments by the country’s then Deputy Prime Minister who said women should not laugh in public.

Alana wanted to explore and learn more about the women of the country. Visiting Turkey in 2015 and 2016, she interviewed and photographed a wide range of women - some who identified with the term 'feminist', others who did not, calling it instead a movement of Western women and preferring their actions define themselves.

As a group they were unified by their outrage about skyrocketing numbers of murdered women - a 1400% increase between 2003 and 2010. But on all other issues - motherhood, politics, sexuality, tradition and religion - they were divided.

Resist Laughter was generously supported by THE POOL COLLECTIVE through The Pool Grant 2016, an annual award providing $10,000, a year of mentorship and a solo exhibition at Head On Photo Festival for one emerging photographer. Proudly printed by Peter Hatzipavlis at 'The PrintShop @ PSC’, Photography Studies College (Melbourne).

Portrait of Feyza, 2016. 85.72cm x 120cm 7+2AP

Portrait of Feyza, 2016. 85.72cm x 120cm 7+2AP

Portrait of Nisan, 2016. 64.29cm x 90cm 7+2AP

Portrait of Nisan, 2016. 64.29cm x 90cm 7+2AP

Portrait of Dilek, 2016, 64.29cm x 90cm 7+2AP

Portrait of Dilek, 2016, 64.29cm x 90cm 7+2AP